Volume 1, Issue 1 (7-2018)                   2018, 1(1): 0-0 | Back to browse issues page

Ethics code: IR.MEDILAM.REC.1396.036

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Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Ilam University of Medical sciences, Ilam, Iran
Abstract:   (2116 Views)
Urinary tract infections are one of the most common bacterial infections in humans of all ages and the use of urinary catheters is one of the most important underlying factors, especially when they remain for a long time. Complications from catheter use can sometimes lead to serious risks, such as "blood infections" or death. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacterial urinary tract infections after catheterization and to determine the pattern of antibiotic resistance of bacteria isolated from patients.
. At least 2 urine samples were taken from each patient, before and after catheterization, and after transferring them to the laboratory, in order to count the colonies, they were inoculated to appropriate culture media by standard methods. By isolating and identifying the bacteria, a suspension was prepared from each known colony and tested for susceptibility or resistance to eight different antibiotics by "disk-diffusion" (and the Kirby-Bauer method).
The results showed that out of 87 patients who did not have any signs or symptoms of urinary tract infection before receiving the catheter, 38 (43.6%) became infected with bacteriuria at the end of catheterization, while the highest rate of bacteriuria was in the age of 30-39. Year (28.9%) and the lowest was in the ages of 60-69 years (2.6%). The results of culture of urine samples led to the isolation of 50 bacterial strains, among which, E. coli with 17 strains (34%) the highest rate and, Kl. pneumoniae, Staph. aureus Edwardsiella tarda and Ent. sakazakii had the lowest percentage (2%) of isolates. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenesis and Klebsiella rhinoschromatis showed the highest resistance to ampicillin, penicillin and cephalexin antibiotics and the lowest resistance to nalidixic acid, gentamicin and nitrofurantoin. Staphylococcus epidermidis also showed the highest resistance to penicillin and ampicillin (100% each) and the lowest resistance to gentamicin (66.7%) and cotrimoxazole and nitrofurantoin (50%). Other isolated bacteria showed varying degrees of resistance or susceptibility to the antibiotics tested.
The results of this study indicate an increase in the resistance of these bacteria to ampicillin and penicillin G, the need to replace them with other antibiotics if it is possible not to use urinary catheters.
Evaluation of the incidence of urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients and the effect of standard bladder catheterization training on the knowledge and attitude of nurses working in intensive care units of Shahid Mostafa Khomeini Hospital in Ilam in 2017
Urinary tract infections are one of the most common bacterial infections of humans of all ages and use
Urinary catheters are one of the most important underlying factors, especially when they remain for a long time. Complications from catheter use can sometimes lead to serious risks, such as "blood infections" or death. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacterial urinary tract infections after catheterization and to determine the pattern of antibiotic resistance of bacteria isolated from patients.
In this study, a total of ٢٢٦ ٢٢٦ samples of ١١٩ patients who underwent different surgeries for different parts of the two
Razi and Golestan hospitals in Ahvaz were referred and catheterized and studied. At least from each patient
Urine samples were taken before and after catheterization, and after transferring them to the laboratory, in order to count the colonies, they were inoculated into suitable culture media by standard methods. By isolating and identifying the bacteria, a suspension from each colony was prepared in terms of susceptibility or resistance to ٨ (known as Kirby-Bauer and tested by "disk-diffusion") and tested with various antibiotics. Of the 4 patients who (٤٣% (before the catheter received no signs or symptoms of urinary tract infection) (at the end of the catheterization) became infected with bacteriuria, while the highest rate / did not have, 3
٢ percent). Results: 7.1 years (1-4%) and the lowest at the age of 2.7 years (1-bacteriuria at ages 2 with 5 strains of E. coli) were cultured urine samples leading to the isolation of 2 strains of bacteria, among which The lowest Ent. Sakazakii and Edwardsiella tarda, Kl. Pneumoniae, Staph. Aureus (1%) had the highest amount and (1%) the isolates. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenesis and Klebsiella rhinoschromatis showed the highest resistance to ampicillin, penicillin and cephalexin antibiotics and the lowest resistance to nalidixic acid, gentamicin and nitrofurantoin. Staphylococcus epidermidis also showed the highest resistance to penicillin and ampicillin (با% each) and the lowest resistance to gentamicin ٦٦%) and cotrimoxazole and nitrofurantoin (٥٠%). Other isolated bacteria showed different values ​​with% of resistance or sensitivity to the antibiotics tested.
Necessity, G The results of this study indicate an increase in resistance of these bacteria to ampicillin and penicillin
Replace them with other antibiotics if possible by not using urinary catheters.
     
: Cross sectional | Subject: General
Received: 2018/07/29 | Accepted: 2018/09/29 | Published: 2018/07/15

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